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Chapultepec Peace Accords

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The Chapultepec Peace Accords brought peace to El Salvador in 1992 after more than a decade of civil war.[1]

The treaty was negotiated[2] by representatives of the Salvadoran government, the rebel movement FMLN, and political parties, with observers from the Roman Catholic Church and United Nations. The peace talks were mediated by Alvaro de Soto, the special representative of the UN Secretary General.[3]

The treaty was the result of a UN backed peace process that had begun in 1990.[4] On December 31, 1991, the government and the FMLN initialed a preliminary peace agreement under the auspices of UN Secretary-General Javier Pérez de Cuéllar. The final agreement was signed in Mexico City on January 16, 1992, at Chapultepec Castle.

A nine-month cease-fire took effect February 1, 1992,[5] and has never been broken.

The Accords included a seventy percent reduction of the armed forces, the dissolution of the rapid deployment forces, the National Guard, the National Police, the Treasury Police and the transfer of the state intelligence agencies to the Presidency of the Republic. All armed FMLN units were also demobilized.

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Uppsala Conflict Data Program Conflict Encyclopedia, El Salvador, In Depth: Negotiating a settlement to the conflict, http://www.ucdp.uu.se/gpdatabase/gpcountry.php?id=51&regionSelect=4-Central_Americas#, viewed on May 24, 2013
  2. ^ Pugh, Jeffrey (January 2009). "The Structure of Negotiation: Lessons from El Salvador for Contemporary Conflict Resolution". Negotiation Journal. 25 (1): 83–105. 
  3. ^ De Soto, Alvaro. 1999. "Ending violent conflict in El Salvador." In A. Crocker, F. Hampson, and P. Aall, eds. Herding cats: Multiparty mediation in a complex world. Washington, DC: USIP Press
  4. ^ Uppsala Conflict Data Program Conflict Encyclopedia, El Salvador, In Depth: Negotiating a settlement to the conflict, http://www.ucdp.uu.se/gpdatabase/gpcountry.php?id=51&regionSelect=4-Central_Americas#, viewed on May 24, 2013
  5. ^ February 02, 1992|By New York Times News Service, Baltimore Sun, Civil war ends at last in El Salvador, but differences persist after cease-fire, http://articles.baltimoresun.com/1992-02-02/news/1992033025_1_el-salvador-san-salvador-peace-commission

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