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Eurovision Song Contest 1978

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Eurovision Song Contest 1978
ESC 1978 logo.png
Dates
Final22 April 1978
Host
VenuePalais des Congrès
Paris, France
Presenter(s)Denise Fabre
Léon Zitrone
ConductorFrançois Rauber[1]
Executive supervisorFrank Naef
Host broadcasterTélévision Française 1 (TF1)
Interval actStéphane Grappelli and Oscar Peterson,
Yehudi Menuhin,
Kenny Clarke,
Niels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen
Participants
Number of entries20
Debuting countriesNone
Returning countries Denmark
 Turkey
Withdrawing countriesNone
Vote
Voting systemEach country awarded 12, 10, 8-1 points to their 10 favourite songs
Nul points Norway
Winning song Israel
"A-Ba-Ni-Bi"

The Eurovision Song Contest 1978 was the 23rd edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It was held on 22 April 1978 in Paris. The contest was won by Izhar Cohen & the Alphabeta who represented Israel with the song "A-Ba-Ni-Bi". Although 'A-Ba-Ni-Bi' is the correct title, French television mistakenly captioned on screen the song title as 'Ah-Bah-Nee-Bee'. The presenters were Denise Fabre and Léon Zitrone, and this was the first time more than one presenter hosted an edition of the Contest and the first to have a male presenter since 1956. In addition, the two presenters served as commentators for France. Twenty countries participated, a record at the time.

The winning entry was a love song sung in the Hebrew equivalent of Ubbi dubbi (the title is an expansion of the Hebrew word ani אני, meaning "I"). This was Israel's first Eurovision win. The win caused problems for several North African and Middle-Eastern nations that were televising the contest, even though they were not participating. According to author and political commentator John Kennedy O'Connor in his book The Eurovision Song Contest: The Official History, when Israel became the clear winners during the voting, most of the Arabic stations ended their transmission of the contest. Jordanian TV finished the show with a photo of a bunch of daffodils on screen,[2] later announcing that the Belgian entry (which finished second) was the winner. Television of the USSR for the first time showed a competition, and until 1988 only performances of several participants, each time with the exception of representatives of Israel.[3] Norway finished last for the fifth time, gaining the first nul points during the current voting system was implemented in 1975.

Location[edit]

The event took place in Paris, the capital and largest city of France, with the host venue being the Palais des congrès de Paris which is a concert venue, convention centre and shopping mall in the 17th arrondissement of Paris. The venue was built by French architect Guillaume Gillet, and was inaugurated in 1974.

Format[edit]

Björn Skifs was unhappy with the rule that every country would have to perform in their native language. He planned to sing in English anyway, but changed his mind at the very last moment, causing him to completely forget the lyrics. He therefore sang the first few lines in gibberish before finding the words again. Along with the 20 participating countries, the show was also broadcast live in Yugoslavia, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, Jordan, East Germany, Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Dubai, Hong Kong, the Soviet Union and Japan.

Participating countries[edit]

This was the first Contest in which both Greece and Turkey participated; Greece made its debut in the Contest in 1974 in Brighton, but the following year they withdrew in response to the 1974 Turkish invasion of Cyprus, in protest of Turkey's participation in Stockholm. Greece subsequently returned in 1976 in The Hague with a song about the Cyprus crisis, "Panayia Mou, Panayia Mou", the English version of which was entitled "The death of Cyprus", and they also participated in 1977 in London with "Mathima Solfege", Turkey then in turn pulled out from the Contest in protest of the Greek participations. This pattern would repeat over the following years; in 1979 Greece took part in the Contest with "Sokrati" in Jerusalem – but Turkey withdrew. In 1980 both countries returned, with "Autostop" and "Pet'r Oil" respectively. Despite Turkey's failure to recognise the Greek government in Cyprus, all three countries performed together when Cyprus debuted in 1981 and it continued until 2012.

Denmark returned to the contest this year, for the first time since 1966.

The Greek entry this year was a song called "Charlie Chaplin", in reference to the comedian who died the previous year. In a curious twist, however, regular entrants Peter, Sue and Marc had entered the German national final with a song also called "Charlie Chaplin". They lost out at third place however. The song from Monaco also made reference to Charlie Chaplin, but not as the main theme.

Conductors[edit]

Each performance had a conductor who conducted the orchestra.

Returning artists[edit]

Several artists returned to the 1978 Contest. Ireen Sheer had previously represented Luxembourg in 1974, and finished in equal fourth place. Jean Vallée also returned, eight years after representing Belgium in 1970, while Norbert Niedermeyer, who had represented Austria in 1972 as part of the band The Milestones, was back as a member of the Austrian band Springtime.

Results[edit]

Draw Country Artist Song Language[4] Place Points
01  Ireland Colm C. T. Wilkinson "Born to Sing" English 5 86
02  Norway Jahn Teigen "Mil etter mil" Norwegian 20 0
03  Italy Ricchi e Poveri "Questo amore" Italian 12 53
04  Finland Seija Simola "Anna rakkaudelle tilaisuus" Finnish 18 2
05  Portugal Gemini "Dai li dou" Portuguese 17 5
06  France Joël Prévost "Il y aura toujours des violons" French 3 119
07  Spain José Vélez "Bailemos un vals" Spanisha 9 65
08  United Kingdom Co-Co "The Bad Old Days" English 11 61
09   Switzerland Carole Vinci "Vivre" French 9 65
10  Belgium Jean Vallée "L'amour ça fait chanter la vie" French 2 125
11  Netherlands Harmony "'t Is OK" Dutch 13 37
12  Turkey Nilüfer & Nazar "Sevince" Turkish 18 2
13  Germany Ireen Sheer "Feuer" German 6 84
14  Monaco Caline & Olivier Toussaint "Les jardins de Monaco" French 4 107
15  Greece Tania Tsanaklidou "Charlie Chaplin" (Τσάρλυ Τσάπλιν) Greek 8 66
16  Denmark Mabel "Boom Boom" Danish 16 13
17  Luxembourg Baccara "Parlez-vous français?" French 7 73
18  Israel Izhar Cohen and the Alphabeta "A-Ba-Ni-Bi" (א-ב-ני-בי) Hebrew 1 157
19  Austria Springtime "Mrs. Caroline Robinson" Germanb 15 14
20  Sweden Björn Skifs "Det blir alltid värre framåt natten" Swedish 14 26

Notes:

a. ^ Contains some words in French.
b. ^ Contains some words in English.

Scoreboard[edit]

Results
Total score
Ireland
Norway
Italy
Finland
Portugal
France
Spain
United Kingdom
Switzerland
Belgium
Netherlands
Turkey
Germany
Monaco
Greece
Denmark
Luxembourg
Israel
Austria
Sweden
Contestants
Ireland 86 12 3 5 7 10 10 5 10 10 6 8
Norway 0
Italy 53 10 6 1 4 8 6 1 1 1 2 8 2 3
Finland 2 2
Portugal 5 4 1
France 119 6 3 10 2 2 5 8 6 8 6 4 10 5 8 8 1 5 12 10
Spain 65 7 8 2 4 7 4 6 12 2 6 7
United Kingdom 61 3 6 2 3 2 4 2 6 8 7 3 5 2 5 3
Switzerland 65 5 1 1 7 4 2 7 8 6 2 3 8 1 10
Belgium 125 12 7 6 6 4 12 2 12 10 5 3 12 12 7 7 4 4
Netherlands 37 5 3 4 1 5 6 12 1
Turkey 2 1 1
Germany 84 1 3 12 7 10 3 5 7 8 10 7 1 3 7
Monaco 107 4 4 7 8 5 1 10 5 6 10 5 7 4 10 8 1 12
Greece 66 7 2 5 8 10 7 4 4 4 10 3 2
Denmark 13 6 1 4 2
Luxembourg 73 2 12 12 12 7 3 3 2 6 1 7 6
Israel 157 8 8 8 10 10 8 6 5 12 12 12 12 12 3 5 6 12 8
Austria 14 3 3 1 2 5
Sweden 26 5 10 4 3 4
The table is ordered by appearance

12 points[edit]

Below is a summary of all 12 points in the final:

N. Contestant Voting nation
6 Israel Belgium, Germany, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Switzerland, Turkey
5 Belgium France, Greece, Ireland, Monaco, United Kingdom
3 Luxembourg Italy, Portugal, Spain
1 France Austria
Germany Finland
Ireland Norway
Monaco Sweden
Netherlands Israel
Spain Denmark

International broadcasts and voting[edit]

Spokespersons[edit]

The table below shows the order in which votes were cast during the 1978 contest along with the spokesperson who was responsible for announcing the votes for their respective country. Each country had a jury who awarded 12, 10, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 points for their top ten songs.

  1.  IrelandJohn Skehan
  2.  Norway – Egil Teige[5]
  3.  Italy – Mariolina Cannuli
  4.  Finland – Kaarina Pönniö[6]
  5.  Portugal – Isabel Wolmar
  6.  France - Marc Menant
  7.  SpainMatías Prats
  8.  United KingdomColin Berry
  9.   Switzerland – Michel Stocker[7]
  10.  Belgium – André Hagon
  11.  Netherlands – Dick van Bommel
  12.  Turkey – Meral Savcı
  13.  Germany – Ute Verhoolen
  14.  Monaco – Carole Chabrier
  15.  Greece – TBC
  16.  Denmark – Jens Dreyer
  17.  Luxembourg – Jacques Harvey
  18.  Israel – Yitzhak Shim'oni[8]
  19.  Austria – Jenny Pippal
  20.  SwedenSven Lindahl[9]

Television[edit]

Each national broadcaster (with the exception of Israel) also sent a commentator to the contest, in order to provide coverage of the contest in their own native language.

Participating countries[edit]

Non-participating countries[edit]

  •  Algeria – TBC
  •  Czechoslovakia – TBC
  •  Dubai – TBC
  •  East Germany – TBC
  •  Hong Kong – TBC
  •  Hungary – TBC
  •  Iceland – Ragna Ragnars (Ríkisútvarpið/RÚV)[22]
  •  Japan – TBC
  •  Jordan – TBC[23]
  •  Morocco – TBC
  •  Poland – TBC
  •  Soviet Union – TBC
  •  Tunisia – TBC
  •  Yugoslavia – Milovan Ilić (TVB2), Oliver Mlakar (TVZ 1), Tomaž Terček (TVL1)

Radio[edit]

Some participating countries did not provide radio broadcasts for the event; the ones who did are listed below.

References[edit]

  1. ^ O'Connor, John Kennedy (2007). The Eurovision Song Contest: The Official History. UK: Carlton Books. p. 217. ISBN 978-1-84442-994-3.
  2. ^ O'Connor, John Kennedy. The Eurovision Song Contest – The Official History. Carlton Books, UK. 2007 ISBN 978-1-84442-994-3
  3. ^ [1]
  4. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 1978". The Diggiloo Thrush. Retrieved 4 March 2012.
  5. ^ Dyrseth, Seppo (OGAE Norway)
  6. ^ "Selostajat ja taustalaulajat läpi vuosien? • Viisukuppila". Viisukuppila.fi. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  7. ^ Baumann, Peter Ramón (OGAE Switzerland)
  8. ^ "פורום אירוויזיון". Sf.tapuz.co.il. 1999-09-13. Archived from the original on October 8, 2011. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  9. ^ a b c "Infosajten.com". Infosajten.com. Archived from the original on July 18, 2012. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  10. ^ "Hvem kommenterte før Jostein Pedersen? - Debattforum". Nrk.no. Archived from the original on November 2, 2012. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  11. ^ "Selostajat ja taustalaulajat läpi vuosien? • Viisukuppila". Viisukuppila.fi. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  12. ^ "Comentadores Do ESC – escportugalforum.pt.vu | o forum eurovisivo português". 21595.activeboard.com. Archived from the original on April 21, 2012. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  13. ^ a b Christian Masson. "1978 – Paris". Songcontest.free.fr. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  14. ^ "FORO FESTIVAL DE EUROVISIÓN • Ver Tema – Uribarri comentarista Eurovision 2010". Eurosongcontest.phpbb3.es. Archived from the original on 2012-03-17. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  15. ^ "Grand Final: 1978, 1978, Eurovision Song Contest". BBC.
  16. ^ Adriaens, Manu & Loeckx-Van Cauwenberge, Joken. Blijven kiken!. Lannoo, Belgium. 2003 ISBN 90-209-5274-9
  17. ^ "Welkom op de site van Eurovision Artists". Eurovisionartists.nl. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  18. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 1978". Ecgermany.de. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  19. ^ "Η Μακώ Γεωργιάδου και η EUROVISION (1970–1986)". Retromaniax.gr. Retrieved 2012-08-10.[permanent dead link]
  20. ^ "Forside". esconnet.dk. Archived from the original on 2012-03-24. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  21. ^ [2] Archived October 24, 2007, at the Wayback Machine
  22. ^ Háskólabókasafn, Landsbókasafn Íslands -. "Timarit.is". timarit.is.
  23. ^ "Eurovision 1978 Results: Voting & Points". eurovisionworld.com. Eurovision World. Retrieved 2 September 2016. In 1978, Jordan showed flowers instead of the Israeli entry on their screening of the show. When Israel went on to win, they pretended that Belgium had instead
  24. ^ "Programme radio du 22 au 28 avril". Radio TV - Je vois tout. Lausanne, Switzerland: Le Radio SA. 20 April 1978.

External links[edit]