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Isagiyosa

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Cherry blossoms are a symbol of isagiyosa in the sense of embracing the transience of the world

In Japanese society, particularly in historical feudal Japan, isagiyosa (潔さ, "purity") is a virtue, translated with "resolute composure" or "manliness".[citation needed] Isagiyosa is the capability of accepting death with composure and equanimity.[citation needed] It stands besides other central virtues such as public-spiritedness (kō no seishin), loyalty (seijitsusa), diligence (kinbensa) and steadiness (jimichisa).

Cherry blossoms, because of their ephemeral nature, are a symbol of isagiyosa in the sense of embracing the transience of the world.[1] Honda (2001) maintains that these virtues are not Japanese in particular but form a moral code common to all Asian agricultural societies.[2]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Richard J. Berenson, Neil deMause, The complete illustrated guidebook to Prospect Park and the Brooklyn Botanic Garden (2001), p. 121.
  2. ^ Honda Yoshihiko, 2001, ‘Taiwan de “Taiwanron” wa dô yomareta ka,’ Sekai 688: pp. 220-228, cited after Ulrike Wöhr, Japan’s “Return to Asia”: History, Diversity, Gender, “Images of Asia in Japanese Mass Media, Popular Culture and Literature”, Papers Presented at ICAS 2, Berlin, Germany, 9–12 August 2001ü .