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Juan José Elguézabal

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Juan José Elguezábal
9th Governor of Coahuila and Texas
In office
1834 – May 12, 1835
Preceded byJuan José de Vidaurri y Villaseñor
Succeeded byJosé María Cantú
Personal details
Born1781
San Antonio, Texas
Died1840
Matamoros, Mexico
ProfessionMilitary, Presidios´s Inspector and Governor of Texas (1834 and 1835)

Juan José Elguezábal (1781-1840) was a Spanish and Mexican soldier; and attached inspector of Presidios. He also served as Interim Governor of Coahuila y Tejas between 1834 and 1835. In addition, he served in the Texas Revolution as commander of First Company of Tamaulipas, Mexico; fighting against the separatists of Texas.

Biography[edit]

Elguezábal was born in 1781, in San Antonio, Texas to María Gertrudis Jiménez and Juan Bautista Elguézabal; a former Governor of Texas between 1800 and 1805. Elguezábal joined the Spanish Army in his youth and he spent the most of his professional career in Coahuila (modern day Mexico). There he was Army's Captain, Río Grande, Presidio's Commander, and like his father before him, an Attached Inspector in the Coahuila and Texas Presidios.[1] Eventually, Elguezábal ascended to Colonel.[2][3]

In August 30, 1834, Elguezábal was appointed Interim Governor of Texas by the City Hall of Monclova, Coahuila. He remained in charge until Agustín Viesca was appointed as new official Governor of Texas, leaving the charge on May 12, 1835.

Elguezábal participated in the Texas Revolution as the commander of the First Company of Tamaulipas. On December 10, 1835, he was captured alongside Martín Perfecto de Cos during the Siege of Bexar. Eventually released, he returned to Matamoros, Mexico; where he would reside until his death in 1840.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b ELGUÉZABAL, JUAN JOSÉ. Retrieved in July 8, 2014, to 16:20 pm.
  2. ^ Actions of the Texas Legislature in 1834. Retrieved in July 8, 2014, to 16:35 pm.
  3. ^ Barker, Eugene C. (1926). The Life of Stephen F. Austin, Founder of Texas, 1793-1836. Page 401. Cokesbury Press.